Destello De Azulgrana – Flash of Blue and Scarlet

A world sport such as football often undergoes analysis by many different people and organisations. Trying to understand what makes one team better than another is a task everyone tries to do, and this involves discerning the numerous tactics and play-styles. One such style is the “tiki-taka”, perfected by Barcelona FC and employed by the Spain national team.

Tiki-taka is a tactical play-style that involves quick passing and constantly moving players. The idea is to move the ball quickly between players in triangles and pinning opposition players in the own half. A large part of this tactic is being patient, to keep passing and wait for an opportunity to score a goal. A team can’t score if they don’t even have the ball!

This particular style of football was made famous in Spain, by Barcelona FC. In fact, it was so successful that it was adopted by the Spanish national team and won them many trophies as a result. Not only this, but there are a myriad of documents that attempt to analyse this tactic, in order to replicate it. There are no direct comparisons made between Spanish football styles and Australia,  but we can establish which team is better simply by statistics alone.

The only competition the two teams play in together, is the World Cup. Spain has won the world cup and Australia hasn’t.  On top of that, the FIFA World ranking rates Spain as the #6 in the world and Australia as #58. It can be easily determined that the Spanish style of football is superior to the Australian style, whatever that may be.

This ethnocentric view however is quickly adopted by many people all over the world, when they compare their own country’s football to Spain’s. Only Spain’s direct competition such as Germany or Argentina may not adopt these ethnocentric views of tiki-taka, and instead analyse their style through a lens of cultural relativity.

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